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A study has been published by two UC-Berkeley researchers that found that, at least in Chicago, crime drops when the game is on. The study found that on Sundays when the Bears were playing, crime in the city dropped 3%, while over Super Bowl weekend, crime in the city dropped a staggering 25%. It’s an interesting study that brings up noteworthy questions on what crime actually is and why people commit them in the first place. But perhaps more interesting than all of this is the fact that the publication of this study has made Ray Lewis a de facto expert in crime.

The fact that such a beloved staple of the NFL culture could have an understanding of what it means to commit a violent crime is, no doubt, unsettling and unexpected, especially with such a vibrant and upstanding figure like Ray Lewis. The fact remains, however, that during the 2011 lockout, Lewis mentioned that crime would go up on Sundays as a result of people not being able to watch football. It seems as though, somehow, Lewis was able to get into the mind of someone contemplating a violent crime and understand the true motivations behind such unspeakable actions.

At press time, a follow-up study has been published finding that there are 17 percent fewer stabbings in Baltimore during times at which Ray Lewis is away from the city to film segments for ESPN, no doubt due to his positive influence on the people watching.