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Tony Romo received an epidural injection after the Cowboys 24-23 of the Washington Redskins, ESPN’s Ed Werder reports. This is much different from the shots Kerry Collins used to block out the pain, but very similar to the ones expectant mothers use when preparing to give birth to a son who will make hilarious jokes online about Tony Romo throwing interceptions at inopportune times.

Poor Romo can’t catch a break. He played well in a come-from-behind victory on Sunday but it doesn’t look like he will have the opportunity to redeem himself for the ghosts of week 17s past. No one would fault him for missing the rest of the season, as Adam Schefter reported he would. But then Yosemite Sam with a $500 haircut Jerry Jones runs his mouth to reporters and suggests that Romo might be able to play in Sundays de facto NFC East “championship” match-up against the Eagles. Translation= Romo should play and if he doesn’t then he doesn’t have enough heart.

On the real though, where should painkilling shots fit in to the P.E.D. equation? If the NFL is going to make the case that adderall is “performance enhancing” because it helps players study, why are painkilling shots still ok? They’re clearly drugs, they  help players perform better, and their safety is questionable, especially considering that the human body sends pain signals because something is in danger of being screwed up permanently. A painkilling shot doesn’t fix anything except the current inconvenience. They’re like China’s recent move of changing the guidelines for issuing air quality warnings because they were issuing too many air quality warnings.

Like every other week 17 in his career, Romo is in a no-win situation. If he doesn’t play he’ll be tagged as “soft” thanks to his owner. If he does play, he’ll be dealing with the effects of a crippling back injury and will still receive the blame for a Cowboys loss- and he can thank Jerry for that.