Hundreds of years from now when archeologists examine American Folk Art from the late-20th century through the early-21st century, they will have no choice but to conclude this was a time of great wizards, busty nymphs, wolves, unicorns and dancing bears.

And then they will discover this car in the ruins of West, Texas and learn this was also a time of great warriors, not like the ones they have seen on so many other vans with swords or riding mighty horses. Two men known as Cowboys, and they will wonder what sort of rulers they were inspire people to put their likeness on a car. Maybe they’ll contact their fellow researchers in Ohio and see if these to faces match the statues unearthed in Canton, Landry and Smith perhaps. The side panels will carefully dismantled and reassembled in a small auto museum outside of Detroit where researchers in the obscure ancient game of football will come to pay homage to the gladiators of old and marvel at the beauty found in this piece from two men thought to have been ruthless in play.

But back here in current times? We will look at this car in a different light. We will look at this car and think, “YEEEEEEEHAAAAAA, I’M CRAZY.”