Trevor Pryce spent 14 years in the NFL as a solid defensive lineman for the Broncos, Ravens and, briefly, the Jets. He retired following the 2010 season. At the time of his retirement, there were rumblings about his interest in producing film projects. He even pitched doing a film score to a Hollywood executive, a suggestion that was pretty much laughed off. But it’s clear that Pryce has a bent for the creative and a desire to make a post-football life as filmmaker in some capacity.

So far, a film project hasn’t materialized, but Pryce has a co-author credit for a newly released fantasy book about frogs.

An Army of Frogs follows Darrel, who is usually in trouble for fighting with Arabanoo’s gang of juvenile delinquent tree frogs. Darrel and his best friend Gee (Gurnugan) sneak off to a distant border area of the Amphibilands near the outback to get a wattleflower that their friend Coorah needs for some herbal medicine. They are horrified to discover the army of scorpions already entering the Amphibilands in preparation for the Veil’s destruction. Gee is captured, and Darrel is torn between trying to rescue him (which would mean sneaking into the scorpion’s camp, like a brave Kulipari warrior undoubtedly would), or leaving to find the turtle king to warn him (which would be more prudent, but would mean abandoning Gee).

Tough call. For what it’s worth, the last time I counted on the turtle king, it was a definite letdown, but that could also just be the LSD.

Anyway, what are reviews saying about the book?

An Army of Frogs is a fast-paced adventure of manly derring-do for adolescent male readers. It contains numerous batrachian references such as Darrel, his mother, and his friends hopping instead of walking; Darrel’s preference for traveling through the branches of trees instead of on the ground; and Darrel’s worry about being “ponded” (grounded) by his mother if he gets caught. The title itself is another reference; the collective pronoun for a group of frogs is an “army”.

Loaded with frog puns! Just what I look for in YA books from former football players.

Okay, maybe I’m not the intended audience. But I do appreciate the Trevor is following his second dream and so passionate about it that he’s apparently arguing in the comments section of website reviews of the book.