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One of the more grating phenomena that you tend to find with sports on a local level is when fan bases of teams that play different but concurrently operating sports in the same market start bickering with one another about who should be watching what. Such a scene is presently playing out in D.C., where a contingent of haughty dipsh*t baseball fans are letting out a hue and cry because local media and even local bars have the audacity to continue paying attention to the Redskins, the most popular team in the area for quite some time, in great detail despite the fact that the Nationals are in the postseason.

For those outside the D.C. area, the knee-jerk response is “LOLZ, the Nationals have fans?” While perhaps cruel, it’s not necessarily an unfair response, because the Nats do not, in fact, have a huge amount of hardcore followers. Part of that is because Washington is a football town. Part of it is just that the Nats haven’t been around that long. Nevertheless, baseball bandwagonism is off the charts round these parts. Yet somehow it’s not even the bandwagoners who are being the most irritating. It’s the small but extremely vocal group who stuck with the Nats through seven whole years of losing and local media inattention. It was this period, apparently, that fostered a pissy persecution complex that is coming to a head right now.

On Sunday, there was about an hour or so of overlap between the Redskins loss to the Falcons and the start of Game 1 of the Nationals-Cardinals division series. Apparently there were a few bars in the suburbs that wouldn’t accommodate baseball fans who came out to watch their game but were instead met with rows of TVs exclusively broadcasting football and no one willing to switch one over for them. Yes, it sucks that these bars gave patrons static about switching a TV or two over to the baseball game. But the incidents have given a springboard to a cadre of asshole baseball partisans who persist in demanding that no one – NO ONE! – should be paying attention to football at a time like this. After all, Dan Snyder detests you and takes your money. The Nats are supposedly a kinder, softer, much successful alternative, even though there’s the whole matter of Nationals owner Ted Lerner stiffing the city on a sh*tload of rent money even though he got a sweetheart deal on his baseball stadium.

Anyway, this situation is hardly unique to D.C. It can be observed in just about any market when there’s a successful season by a team that doesn’t typically draw as much interest as a team in another sport. For whatever reason, there’s a pointless jockeying for attention that does nothing but detract for the winning that everyone is could be enjoying if they were just allowed to maintain their viewing habits as they saw fit.

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The Sean Taylor Memorial Meast for Week 5 is Reggie Wayne, who had 13 catches for 212 yards, as well as the last-minute go-ahead touchdown catch that required fighting through three defenders. You know Wayne had an awesome game because even unrepentant starfuckers like Peter King who are predisposed to give Andrew Luck all the credit for the comeback win have been forced to compliment Reggie for his meastiness. Reggie had five catches on the winning drive while fighting through cramps. Mike Silver’s piece on his performance and decision to stay in Indy over the off-season is a worthwhile read.

Also receiving consideration: Ahmad Bradshaw, Charles Tillman and Lance Briggs, J.J. Watt, Stevan Ridley

The Jeff George Memorial Least for Week 5 is Michael Vick, who fumbled three times, two of which were lost, in Sunday’s loss in Pittsburgh. Andy Reid shares in the blame since he continues to call QB keepers at the goal line even though he has LeSean McCoy. But it’s about time Vick is recognized for his feats in cranking out turnovers at near Sex Cannon rate. Who could have known that giving the ball away three or four times a game wasn’t a sustainable formula for winning?

Also receiving consideration: Willis McGahee, D’Anthony Baptiste, Willie Colon, Andy Reid and Romeo Crennel (for calling designed QB runs inside the five when their most talented players are their running backs)