photo_derek_jeter
Why would the NFL want to dim this man’s spotlight?

The NFL will likely add an 18th game to the Sunday Night Football lineup and go head-to-head with the World Series of Baseball. The rumor, reported by football/legal whiz Bob Florio at ProFootballTalk.com, has the NFL scheduling a game on the night of October 31, the same time as Game Three of the World Series.

I know of no way to sugar-coat it, so I will just come out and say it: this is a cockamamie idea. Now, I know some of your first reactions might be to rush to the comments and call me a b-hole, but please hear me out first. I am confident you’ll see the wisdom in my thinking.

Sure, “macho” NFL fans might beat their chests and say: “Bring it on! SNF’s television ratings will be competitive with that of the World Series!” There’s even a slight chance you might be correct. But you’re missing the larger point. This isn’t about which league is “toppa the food chain”. Rather it’s about Respect for Boundaries. It’s about maintaining decorum and civility in an “ordered society”.

The NFL has always been mindful of baseball’s permanent place as The National Pastime and shown its respect by not scheduling a “prime-time” game during the first Sunday of the Series. And everything has gone swimmingly. So why change now? After all, Major League Baseball doesn’t show up during the middle of the Super Bowl and glom all the attention. This is just plain rude to Baseball commissioner Bud Selig—a man who has time and again shown that he has finger squarely on the pulse of the American Sports Fan.

And it’s the fans who are losers in all this. Suddenly I’m being told I have to abandon either football or baseball for the evening. It’s quite tragic. You know how announcers sometimes say “Game Six, if necessary”? Well to me, every game is necessary and every game is precious. I shudder at the prospect of having to choose between Derek Jeter and Brett Favre. Or even worse–between Joe Buck and Peter King. This cannot happen!

For the greater good, NFL Commissioner Goodell must abandon this dern-fool notion at once.